Recreation Advocate

The OutdoorWire family websites feature news and information affecting outdoor recreation opportunities and access to public lands. 
John Stewart

RECREATION GROUPS RESPOND TO THREATS TO MOTORIZED RECREATION IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA FORESTS LAWSUIT

The Recreation Groups filed a motion to intervene on May 15th in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California (Case No. C 08-1185-MHP). The groups petitioning the court include the California Association of Four Wheel Drive Clubs, American Motorcyclist Association District 36, California Enduro Riders Association, and the BlueRibbon Coalition,.

"Once again, the motorized recreation community have little choice but to respond to attempts to close treasured access to historical roads in these 'roadless' areas," said Don Spuhler, Cal4 President. "Apparently high levels of State leadership are dissatisfied by the prospect that these routes continue in use despite the Clinton Roadless Rule and unprecedented Forest Service travel management efforts. We believe it essential to defend this access and proper understanding of the forest planning process," Spuhler concluded.

The Motion to Intervene is presently scheduled to be heard on June 30, 2008.

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The California Association of 4 Wheel Drive Clubs is a California nonprofit organization actively promoting conservation and responsible vehicle-oriented recreation. The Association represents over 8,000 members and 160 member clubs. 1-800-4x4-FUNN. www.cal4wheel.com

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John Stewart

Utah Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Management Workshop

Utah Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Management Workshop

June 23-26, 2008

Weber State University, Davis Campus
2750 North University Park Blvd., Layton, UT 84041-9099

ONLINE REGISTRATION IS OPEN NOW!
https://conference.nohvcc.org/?EVENT&EVENTCODE=010193-45&PASSWORD=nohvcc&template=UTwork

The National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council in cooperation with Davis County, Utah State Parks, US Forest Service Region 4 and the Bureau of Land Management Utah State Office will conduct an Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Management Workshop in Layton on June 23-26, 2008.

The purpose of the 2008 workshop is to conduct an educational forum on OHV recreation management for land management agencies and local government with the specific objectives of:

Defining Utah public land management, public, and industry stakeholder issues;

Sharing the current status of local, state and federal planning efforts;

Building a better understanding of laws and regulations governing the use of OHVs;

Improving education information and the distribution of educational materials to the OHV recreation public;

Improving the planning, design, construction, maintenance, and management of OHV facilities, areas, trails and trail systems in order to:

o Minimize impacts to natural and cultural resources;
o Reduce conflict between recreation and other public land stakeholders; and
o Better meet the needs and desires of the OHV recreation public; and

Improving working relationships between local, state, and federal land management agencies and the OHV community.

The Workshop will consist of classroom instruction and field exercises. In addition, optional ATV Safety Institute(r) ATV RiderCourse(tm), Motorcycle Safety Foundation Dirt Bike School(tm) , and Tread Lightly!(r) Tread Trainers(tm) Course classes will be offered on Monday, June 23.

Please register on-line using the link provided above. Advance registration is required. Registration is required and limited to 80. Registration closes June 17th. Registration fee is $100.00.

For further information regarding the workshop please contact Ann Vance at 888-458-0131 or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council is a non-profit educational foundation. For information regarding NOHVCC and its workshop programs visit its website at www.nohvcc.org.

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John Stewart

Destination: CJ Strike and Fishing

Destination: CJ Strike and Fishing

Friday morning and the blustery wind of the previous days had ended. The morning sun was on its daily path through a clear blue sky. It would be a great day to be outdoors. If you can’t go 4-wheeling, might as well go fishing. Mike and I loaded the boat with necessary gear (poles, tackle, and bait), hooked the trailer to his 4x4 pickup and headed for the lake.

The “lake” is CJ Strike Reservoir managed for recreation opportunities by Idaho Power Company. Located on the Snake River, the reservoir provides hydroelectric power for southwest Idaho and irrigation water for the many farms in the area. CJ Strike also provides a variety of year around recreation opportunities including waterfowl hunting, fishing, and water sports. This day, fishing was on the agenda and crappie were biting.

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John Stewart

Welcome to the new 4x4Wire!

Creating an account is simple and quick, and will enable you to create articles.

We are making all articles submitted within the portal system freely available and redistributable to other sites, as long as they adhere to the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license. After all, those of you who create articles are simply trying to help you fellow 'wheelers, and there is no reason content should be locked up.

We've gone through a great deal of configuration, some considerable testing, and no doubt we'll be tweaking things. One of our immediate goals is to introduce a photo gallery system where each of you can manage your own gallery.

If you see anything out of whack, please let us know. Also, if you have any feedback or constructive criticism, be sure to let us know.

We hope you enjoy the new 4x4Wire.com!

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John Stewart

Caution issued about orphaned wildlife


May 6, 2008

WILDLIFE OFFICIALS CAUTION WELL-MEANING CITIZENS TO THINK BEFORE THEY ACT WHEN IT COMES TO ANIMALS THAT APPEAR ORPHANED
Animals taken from the wild rarely survive hand raising or release back to the wild

COLUMBUS, OH - The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife has some strong advice for well-meaning people who seek to rescue wild animals that appear to be orphaned: Leave them alone!

Every year, wildlife officers, biologists and licensed rehabilitators attempt to educate local residents about the hazards of handling wild animals. Despite their cute, and sometimes helpless appearance, wild animals are capable of biting, scratching and transmitting diseases to humans and domestic animals.

Many people believe that they are doing the right thing by rescuing a young wild animal and think that hand raising is a good alternative to being raised in the wild. This could not be further from the truth as a hand-raised wild animal, even under expert care, has little chance of long-term survival once released to the wild.

State and federal laws protect and regulate all wildlife species in Ohio and only individuals who obtain a special permit from the Division of Wildlife may possess a native wild animal. Because of the difficulties in providing the proper care and diet for wild animals, only specially trained and licensed wildlife rehabilitators are authorized to take them in from the wild when they are found to be truly orphaned or injured.

Each year, wildlife officers issue summons to individuals who have taken wildlife, particularly fawns, out of the wild, even if their intent was to help the animal. When a wildlife official receives a call regarding a fawn, the first thing they do is advise the person to take the animal back to where they found it.

A doe will protect her young from predators by leaving it alone for long periods of time. The fawn may be hidden in a hay field, a grassy meadow, the edge of a homeowner's lawn, or even in a flowerbed. Regardless of where she left the fawn, the doe will stay away until after dark then return to nurse it. If the doe is nowhere in sight, some people mistakenly believe the fawn is abandoned and try to help it by taking it out of the wild.

Wild animals have a better chance of survival if left alone in the wild. Studies have shown that more than half of the fawns that are brought in by well-meaning people do not survive rehabilitation and most of the remaining animals die shortly after reentry to the wild. Additionally, handling stresses the animal, and excessive handling can make the animal defensive or can ultimately contribute to its death.

A common belief is that once young wildlife has been touched or handled by humans the mother will no longer have anything to do with it. This is not so, while wildlife officials discourage people from handling wild animals, there are rare occasions when it may be necessary. If a nestling bird has fallen out of a tree, or your child has plucked a young rabbit from its nest, pick it up and put it back in the nest immediately. Do not attempt to hand raise it.

Wild animals can carry parasites or diseases harmful to humans and pets, including distemper, roundworms and rabies. The risk of disease is another good reason to leave wildlife in the wild.

Along with the warning to leave young and injured wildlife alone, the Division of Wildlife offers the following advice:
Think before you act. Check for nests before cutting down trees or clearing brush. It is best to cut trees and clear brush in the autumn when nesting season is over.
Use common sense. If you disturb a nest, replace the animals and the nest material to the original location or as close as possible. If you find a fawn, leave it where you find it. The doe has likely hidden it there and will be returning to feed it, usually after dark.
Keep pets under control so they do not raid nests and injure wild animals. Keep pets vaccinated against parasites and diseases.
Educate children to respect wildlife and their habitat. Emphasize to your children not to catch, handle, or harass wild animals. Practice what you preach!
Contact your local wildlife officer or wildlife district office before taking action. Trust and follow the advice of these trained professionals.
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