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U.S. Forest Service, BLM, USFWS, NPS, Energy, EPA
John Stewart

Forest Service Publishes Region’s Travel Analysis Reports

USFS LogoAnalyses will guide national forests toward sustainable road system in Pacific Northwest Forests

Portland, Ore -- The U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region released 17 travel analysis reports this week that outline existing road systems and identify opportunities to achieve a more sustainable system of roads for each national forest in the Pacific Northwest. These travel analysis reports are part of nationwide requirement involving national forests across the country. 

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John Stewart

17 Candidate Species Found to No Longer Warrant Listing Due to Conservation Successes

The 17 species that will be removed from the Candidate List are the Cumberland arrow darter, Great Basin population of the Columbia spotted frog, Goose Creek milkvetch, Nevares Spring naucorid bug, Page springsnail, Ramshaw meadows sand verbena, Sequatchie caddisfly, Siskiyou mariposa lily, Sleeping ute milkvetch, Southern Idaho ground squirrel, Tahoe yellow cress and six Tennessee cave beetles (Baker Station, Coleman, Fowler's, Indian Grave Point, Inquirer, and Noblett's beetles).

Additionally, the Service has determined that petitions to list the American eel and Shawnee darter are not warranted under the ESA. Neither are on the ESA candidate species list.
The not warranted determinations (known as 12-month findings) represent compelling examples of American conservation and demonstrate that how the ESA inspires collaboration between federal and state agencies, private companies, conservation organizations and individual landowners.

“We are proud of our close work with so many diverse stakeholders, and of the role of the Endangered Species Act in supporting these collaborations,” said Service Director Dan Ashe. “This model of proactive conservation and partnership should give critics of the Act pause and make us all consider what would be lost to future generations of Americans by weakening the nation’s foremost wildlife conservation law.”

Some examples of the success stories in this status review include:

States and landowners address threats to Great Basin population of Columbia spotted frog. Located in Nevada, southwestern Idaho and southeastern Oregon, the Columbia spotted frog lives its entire life in water and faced the threat of declining water quantity and quality. Following the designation of the frog as an ESA candidate species, states, federal agencies and private landowners went to work clarifying solutions, employing sustainable grazing practices, and creating ponds where the frog has taken up residence and is successfully breeding. As a result of these collaborative conservation efforts, population numbers of the Great Basin Columbia spotted frog have rebounded.

Stakeholders return Siskiyou mariposa lily to healthy populations in northern California. When it was listed as a candidate for the ESA, the Siskiyou mariposa lily was threatened with extinction by loss of habitat from disturbance and non-native invasive plants. In response, the Service partnered with the state of California, private landowners, Siskiyou County Department of Agriculture, Klamath National Forest and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to remove invasive plants from lily habitat on federal and private lands and limit harmful soil disturbance activities.

BLM and Service agreements protect and restore imperiled Goose Creek milkvetch. The milkvetch is located primarily on federal lands in Idaho, Nevada and Utah, and following its listing as an ESA candidate species the Service partnered with BLM and state natural heritage programs to restore and protect its habitat from the invasive plant, leafy spurge. Through a voluntary arrangement called a Candidate Conservation Agreement, federal agencies have protected 86% of the milkvetch’s population and 93% of its known habitat.

State of Arizona and Service collaborate on Page springsnail. The Service worked with Arizona Game and Fish Department on a voluntary conservation agreement that restored Page springsnail habitat on state lands. Through this effort, Arizona enhanced natural springs, created artificial springbrooks, added substrate preferred by the snail, and salvaged snails during the eradication of non-native species. Eight of the ten Page springsnail populations are now stable or increasing.

Kentucky, U.S. Forest Service and Service work together on Cumberland arrow darter. In addition to benefiting from laws and regulations protecting listed fish in its habitat, the Cumberland arrow darter is also aided by the Forest Service's management efforts on Daniel Boone National Forest. Other efforts include range-wide distributional surveys and habitat analyses by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Service, which have found 38 additional streams inhabited by the darter.

Diverse stakeholders restore the New England cottontail. Earlier this month, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell, Service Director Dan Ashe, New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen and leaders of state wildlife agencies announced that the New England cottontail would be removed from the ESA Candidate List, due to successful efforts of states, private landowners, federal agencies and non-profit organizations. The improved young forest habitat that resulted from these efforts benefits not only the cottontail, but at least 65 other species, including woodcock, bobcats, snowshoe hares, songbirds, box turtles and frosted elfin butterflies.

More information is available in the attached FAQ and a summary of all findings in this batch along with their docket numbers can be found at www.federalregister.gov/public-inspection by clicking on the 2015 Notices link under Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. It is also available at www.fws.gov/policy/frsystem/default.cfm. Information can be submitted on species for which a status review is being initiated, using the specified docket number, beginning upon publication in the Federal Register, for 60 days until December 7, 2015.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information, visit www.fws.gov, or connect with us through any of these social media channels: Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube.

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John Stewart

USDA Forest Service Launches Collaborative Process for New Planning Rule

WASHINGTON, Dec. 17, 2009 - Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that the USDA Forest Service is beginning an open, collaborative process to create and implement a modern planning rule to address current and future needs of the National Forest System, including restoring forests, protecting watersheds, addressing climate change, sustaining local economies, improving collaboration, and working across landscapes. The Forest Service will publish a notice of intent (NOI) in the Federal Register tomorrow, December 18, to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to develop a new planning rule that will provide a framework for management of national forests and grasslands.

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John Stewart

Inyo NF Forest Plan Workshops

Inyo National Forest Preparing to Revise 1988 Forest Plan

--Workshops to be Held on Collaboration in Forest Planning, Nov. 16 & 17--

The Inyo National Forest has been designated as an “early adopter” forest by the Forest Service, indicating that the Inyo will be in the first tier of eight national forests to revise their Forest Plan under the new National Forest Land Management Planning Rule adopted earlier this year. The Inyo’s existing plan was completed in 1988.

Forest Plans provide strategic direction to guide the management of forest resources. They are programmatic in nature and provide a framework that guides site-specific project and activity decision making. The new Planning Rule directs that the Forest Plans will be science-based and developed collaboratively with stakeholders who are interested in the management of national forests. The Inyo National Forest is committed to collaboration, improving transparency in the planning process, and strengthening the role of public involvement in the process through opportunities for dialogue about forest plan issues.

Forest Supervisor Ed Armenta would like to invite anyone interested in learning more about the Forest Plan Revision Process, and specifically about the collaborative process the Inyo is proposing to use, to come to one of two workshops on November 16 or 17. Two identical workshops are being planned to accommodate those who can best attend during the work week and those who can best attend outside of normal working hours. Since Bishop is the most central for those participating from the Eastern Sierra both workshops will be held in Bishop at the Inyo National Forest Supervisor’s Office, 351 Pacu Lane, according to the following schedule:


Friday November 16, 9-12 a.m.

Saturday November 17, 9-12 a.m.


The first half of each workshop will consist of presentations and opportunities for questions and answers regarding the Forest Plan Revision process, including an orientation to what a Forest Plan is and what it is not; and a presentation on a Draft Collaboration and Communication Plan for the Plan Revision effort. The second half of the workshop will be an interactive format where participants will have an opportunity to work together on helping to finalize the Collaboration and Communication Plan. Discussions will be on such topics as prioritizing communication tools and techniques for involving a diverse array of stakeholders, collaborative opportunities for the three year Plan Revision process, and how to monitor the progress of the communication and collaboration effort. The workshops will be facilitated by Center for Collaborative Policy facilitator Laura Kaplan.

An opportunity to participate in the workshop via conference call and webinar will be available for the first half of the workshop, with those participating in this way having the ability to provide feedback on the workshop topics in a written format.

For more information about the workshops or the Forest Plan Revision process, or if you have special needs in order to participate, or to find out how to participate remotely, please call Public Affairs Officer Nancy Upham at 760-873-2427, or email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Original author: John
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John Stewart

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project News

Monthly Status Report:  October 1-31, 2012

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in Arizona on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests (ASNF) and Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR) and in New Mexico on the Apache National Forest (ANF) and Gila National Forest (GNF).  Non-tribal lands involved in this Project are collectively known as the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area (BRWRA).  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at http://www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at http://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.  Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting http://www.azgfd.gov/signup.  This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Reintroduction Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

Original author: Arizona


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