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John Stewart

Destination: CJ Strike and Fishing

Destination: CJ Strike and Fishing

Friday morning and the blustery wind of the previous days had ended. The morning sun was on its daily path through a clear blue sky. It would be a great day to be outdoors. If you can’t go 4-wheeling, might as well go fishing. Mike and I loaded the boat with necessary gear (poles, tackle, and bait), hooked the trailer to his 4x4 pickup and headed for the lake.

The “lake” is CJ Strike Reservoir managed for recreation opportunities by Idaho Power Company. Located on the Snake River, the reservoir provides hydroelectric power for southwest Idaho and irrigation water for the many farms in the area. CJ Strike also provides a variety of year around recreation opportunities including waterfowl hunting, fishing, and water sports. This day, fishing was on the agenda and crappie were biting.

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10 Safety Rules For Off-Road Driving

1. Let someone know where you will be and when you expect to return. This applies to all trips, not just those in challenging areas. People have been known to get stuck or lost in relatively easy terrain. Should something happen and you’re unable to leave the area or call for help, your friends or family will know to contact authorities.

2. Always have at least one other vehicle along. This ensures that you will have transportation out in the event your vehicle becomes stuck or damaged and can’t be fixed there. Plus, the extra vehicle means additional manpower to help with problems.

John Stewart

Caution issued about orphaned wildlife

May 6, 2008

WILDLIFE OFFICIALS CAUTION WELL-MEANING CITIZENS TO THINK BEFORE THEY ACT WHEN IT COMES TO ANIMALS THAT APPEAR ORPHANED
Animals taken from the wild rarely survive hand raising or release back to the wild

COLUMBUS, OH - The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife has some strong advice for well-meaning people who seek to rescue wild animals that appear to be orphaned: Leave them alone!

Every year, wildlife officers, biologists and licensed rehabilitators attempt to educate local residents about the hazards of handling wild animals. Despite their cute, and sometimes helpless appearance, wild animals are capable of biting, scratching and transmitting diseases to humans and domestic animals.

Many people believe that they are doing the right thing by rescuing a young wild animal and think that hand raising is a good alternative to being raised in the wild. This could not be further from the truth as a hand-raised wild animal, even under expert care, has little chance of long-term survival once released to the wild.

State and federal laws protect and regulate all wildlife species in Ohio and only individuals who obtain a special permit from the Division of Wildlife may possess a native wild animal. Because of the difficulties in providing the proper care and diet for wild animals, only specially trained and licensed wildlife rehabilitators are authorized to take them in from the wild when they are found to be truly orphaned or injured.

Each year, wildlife officers issue summons to individuals who have taken wildlife, particularly fawns, out of the wild, even if their intent was to help the animal. When a wildlife official receives a call regarding a fawn, the first thing they do is advise the person to take the animal back to where they found it.

A doe will protect her young from predators by leaving it alone for long periods of time. The fawn may be hidden in a hay field, a grassy meadow, the edge of a homeowner's lawn, or even in a flowerbed. Regardless of where she left the fawn, the doe will stay away until after dark then return to nurse it. If the doe is nowhere in sight, some people mistakenly believe the fawn is abandoned and try to help it by taking it out of the wild.

Wild animals have a better chance of survival if left alone in the wild. Studies have shown that more than half of the fawns that are brought in by well-meaning people do not survive rehabilitation and most of the remaining animals die shortly after reentry to the wild. Additionally, handling stresses the animal, and excessive handling can make the animal defensive or can ultimately contribute to its death.

A common belief is that once young wildlife has been touched or handled by humans the mother will no longer have anything to do with it. This is not so, while wildlife officials discourage people from handling wild animals, there are rare occasions when it may be necessary. If a nestling bird has fallen out of a tree, or your child has plucked a young rabbit from its nest, pick it up and put it back in the nest immediately. Do not attempt to hand raise it.

Wild animals can carry parasites or diseases harmful to humans and pets, including distemper, roundworms and rabies. The risk of disease is another good reason to leave wildlife in the wild.

Along with the warning to leave young and injured wildlife alone, the Division of Wildlife offers the following advice:
Think before you act. Check for nests before cutting down trees or clearing brush. It is best to cut trees and clear brush in the autumn when nesting season is over.
Use common sense. If you disturb a nest, replace the animals and the nest material to the original location or as close as possible. If you find a fawn, leave it where you find it. The doe has likely hidden it there and will be returning to feed it, usually after dark.
Keep pets under control so they do not raid nests and injure wild animals. Keep pets vaccinated against parasites and diseases.
Educate children to respect wildlife and their habitat. Emphasize to your children not to catch, handle, or harass wild animals. Practice what you preach!
Contact your local wildlife officer or wildlife district office before taking action. Trust and follow the advice of these trained professionals.
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Colorado's San Juan Mountains of Southwest Colorado

Colorado's San Juan Mountains of Southwest Colorado

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  • Trail Rating: 4WD Easy
  • Good Scenic Trip
  • Forest Scenery, Meadows, Vistas and Overlooks

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Report by: Mike Scott

Joan and I , along with friends Vicki and Gary Allender, took a vacation trip to do some off-roading in the San Juan mountains of Southwest Colorado. During these three days, we traversed the Alpine Loop (Cinnamon Pass and Engineer Pass), Black Bear Pass, and finally Stoney Pass Road.

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COHVCO 8th Annual OHV Management Workshop

8th Annual OHV Management Workshop: "A Tactical Approach to Now and the Future"
July 10-13, 2008
Salida, Colorado

This Special Workshop is FREE For Enthusiasts with FREE Lodging for qualified club reps.

Sponsored by the Colorado Off Highway Vehicle Coalition (COHVCO) with assistance from: NOHVCC, MIC, BRC, US Forest Service, BLM and Colorado State Parks

This year's workshop will take a more tactical, "on the ground" approach with an emphasis on sustainability of existing designated trail systems and building toward future growth of; "Life After The First MVUM". A combined audience of Land Management Agency personnel and Volunteer User Organizations and Recreational Enthusiasts can sit down one on one in a relaxed, educational forum and discuss local issues, and develop the needed contacts to interact closely on the status and implementation of Designated OHV Routes by Travel Management Planning in that area.

Included will be educational discussions of OHV Management Techniques, Volunteer Stewardship, issues and general principles of enhanced social and environmental monitoring, maintenance and management of sustainable motorized trails. This will be coupled with the need to address easily understood companion maps and effective signage.

This collaborative effort will help to build camaraderie and a sense of understanding among agencies and different user groups.

Thursday Check In and evening VIP Welcome Reception (*Hors d'oeuvres and Cash Bar provided*)
OPTIONAL: Trail Crew Leader, Maintenance and Construction Skills Training. Certifications in ATV and Dirt Bike Safety.

Friday Agency & Enthusiast Classroom Sessions will include: (**Continental Breakfast and Lunch provided**)
Back to the Basics of Good OHV Management
§ Techniques in Good OHV Management, Trail Management Objectives and Cost Effective Ways to Implement Signage Plans.
§ Effective Trail Crews; What They Can Do. Managing & Scheduling, Training Resources, Project Funding Eligibility, etc.
§ Enhanced Social and Environmental Monitoring; Traffic Counters, Trail Patrols,
§ Sound Testing, Enforcement and the Future of Sound Limit Restrictions in Colorado.
§ The "4 E's of OHV Management, Sustainable Trail Maintenance Programs and "Life After The First MVUM"
§ The State of OHV's in Colorado; Side by Sides, OHV Parks and Play Areas, New Rules on the Horizon
**Planned Networking Dinner on own**

Saturday Agency & Enthusiast Classroom Sessions and Location Ride with Field Discussions will include:
**Continental Breakfast and Box Lunch provided**
§ USFS Rule and BLM strategy for Route Designation, Inventory, Collaborative Volunteer and TIGeR Team Efforts
§ Living With the MVUM and the Future, Volunteer Projects in Monitoring, Companion Maps for Designated Routes and Effective Signage
§ Technical TIGeR Team GPS/GIS and Global Mapper Software Training
§ Location Rides and Field Exercises, Sound Testing and the Future of Sound Limit Restrictions in Colorado
**Club Sponsored BBQ Donation Dinner**

Sunday Enthusiast Tailgate Sessions and Location Rides with Field Discussions to include:
**Continental Breakfast and Box Lunch provided**
§ Location Rides and Field Exercises with on the ground GPS Data Collections/Definitions and Trail Work Projects

Please mark this on your calendars and REGISTER NOW to attend.
LODGING AND REGISTRATION INFO AVAILABLE at www.cohvco.org

SCHOLARSHIPS ARE AVAILABLE TO OHV ENTHUSIASTS AND CLUB REPS.

For a more information, please contact: Corey Corbett at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The following is now available on line at the COHVCO website. PLEASE CHECK THEM OUT.

COHVCO OHV Workshop Info (July 11-13, Salida, CO) and downloadable Registration form

COHVCO Trails Awards (Nomination deadline June 10) and downloadable Nomination form
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