News and information about environmental and land management action involving U.S. Forest Service

John Stewart

Fuel management best practices report released

Scientists synthesize best practices for fuels management in dry mixed conifer forests

FORT COLLINS, Colo., Nov. 26, 2012 – USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists along with collaborators from Humboldt State University, the University of Montana, and the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, synthesized a vast array of information on the ecology, management strategies, and effectiveness of fuel treatments within the dry mixed conifer forests of the northwestern United States. Because dry mixed conifer forests cover such a broad and diverse region of forested landmass, researchers made site-specific visits to federal, state, and tribal land management organizations to conduct over 50 interviews with resource specialists in Montana, Idaho, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, Oregon, South Dakota, and California. By incorporating the most relevant scientific research and best practice approaches, scientists used this information to develop an organizational framework to support land management strategies. This collaborative effort, co-funded by the Joint Fire Sciences Program and National Fire Plan, is published in a technical report, “A Comprehensive Guide to Fuels Management Practices for Dry Mixed Conifer Forests in the Northwestern United States.”

Original linkOriginal author: USFS
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John Stewart

Inyo NF Forest Plan Workshops

Inyo National Forest Preparing to Revise 1988 Forest Plan --Workshops to be Held on Collaboration in Forest Planning, Nov. 16 & 17-- The Inyo National Forest has been designated as an “early adopter” forest by the Forest Service, indicating that the Inyo will be in the first tier of eight national forests to revise their Forest Plan under the new National Forest Land Management Planning Rule adopted earlier this year. The Inyo’s existing plan was completed in 1988. Forest Plans provide strategic direction to guide the management of forest resources. They are programmatic in nature and provide a framework that guides site-specific project and activity decision making. The new Planning Rule directs that the Forest Plans will be science-based and developed collaboratively with stakeholders who are interested in the management of national forests. The Inyo National Forest is committed to collaboration, improving transparency in the planning process, and strengthening the role of public involvement in the process through opportunities for dialogue about forest plan issues. Forest Supervisor Ed Armenta would like to invite anyone interested in learning more about the Forest Plan Revision Process, and specifically about the collaborative process the Inyo is proposing to use, to come to one of two workshops on November 16 or 17. Two identical workshops are being planned to accommodate those who can best attend during the work week and those who can best attend outside of normal working hours. Since Bishop is the most central for those participating from the Eastern Sierra both workshops will be held in Bishop at the Inyo National Forest Supervisor’s Office, 351 Pacu Lane, according to the following schedule: Friday November 16, 9-12 a.m. Saturday November 17, 9-12 a.m. The first half of each workshop will consist of presentations and opportunities for questions and answers regarding the Forest Plan Revision process, including an orientation to what a Forest Plan is and what it is not; and a presentation on a Draft Collaboration and Communication Plan for the Plan Revision effort. The second half of the workshop will be an interactive format where participants will have an opportunity to work together on helping to finalize the Collaboration and Communication Plan. Discussions will be on such topics as prioritizing communication tools and techniques for involving a diverse array of stakeholders, collaborative opportunities for the three year Plan Revision process, and how to monitor the progress of the communication and collaboration effort. The workshops will be facilitated by Center for Collaborative Policy facilitator Laura Kaplan. An opportunity to participate in the workshop via conference call and webinar will be available for the first half of the workshop, with those participating in this way having the ability to provide feedback on the workshop topics in a written format. For more information about the workshops or the Forest Plan Revision process, or if you have special needs in order to participate, or to find out how to participate remotely, please call Public Affairs Officer Nancy Upham at 760-873-2427, or email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. # # #

Original linkOriginal author: John
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John Stewart

Giant Sequoia National Monument Management Plan Released

Giant Sequoia National Monument Management Plan promotes protection and Ecological Restoration through science and collaboration

Giant Sequoia National Monument Management Plan

PORTERVILLE, Calif.—Today, Forest Supervisor, Kevin B. Elliott, released a new Giant Sequoia National Monument Management Plan (Monument Plan) for one of this Nation’s national treasures.  The Monument Plan guides restoration efforts for giant sequoia ecosystems, watersheds, habitat for old-forest dependent wildlife, and the protection of mountain communities.

Regional Forester, Randy Moore, selected Alternative B and one element of Alternative E (Moses Wilderness recommendation) as the basis for the Monument Plan.

Two years of public collaboration provided the sidebars for a strategic vision for the Giant Sequoia National Monument (Monument). “The public’s tirele

ss efforts have resulted in a framework to restore and manage 33 giant sequoia groves, provide healthy watersheds, homes for unique wildlife, as well as provide spectacular recreation adventures to the American people”, stated Elliott, Forest Supervisor. “Throughout this Monument Plan there is a theme of ecological restoration based on a foundation of science and a set of strong protocols.”

Today’s action culminates years of collaborative efforts with multiple agencies, the scientific community, and an engaged public to develop management direction based on public collaboration and current science.

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John Stewart

Climate Change Report Released

Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts of the Interior American West: A Review and Needs Assessment

FORT COLLINS, Colo., Aug. 27, 2012 - Climate change poses as much risk to public and private grassland and shrubland ecosystems as it does to forested ecosystems yet receives less attention by the public and key stakeholders. Consequently, most climate change research concentrates on forested ecosystems, leaving grassland and shrubland managers with insufficient information to guide decision making. The USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station published a comprehensive report summarizing climate change research and potential effects on grassland, shrub, and desert ecosystems. The report, “Climate Change in Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts of the Interior American West: A Review and Needs Assessment,” highlights current knowledge and future research essential to mitigate the prospective detrimental effects of climate change. It addresses animal, plant, and invasive species models and responses, vulnerabilities and genetic adaption, animal species and habitats, and decision support tools for restoration and land management.

Original linkOriginal author: Press
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John Stewart

Final Forest Planning Rule Released

The USDA and the Forest Service carefully considered over a quarter million comments received on the proposed rule and draft environmental impact statement issued in February to develop today’s final rule, which emphasizes collaboration, sound science and protections for land, water and wildlife.

The final rule strengthens the role of public involvement and dialogue throughout the planning process. It also requires the use of the best available scientific information to inform decisions.

“We are ready to start a new era of planning that takes less time, costs less money, and provides stronger protections for our lands and water”, said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell.  “This new rule will bring 21st century thinking to a process that is sorely needed to protect and preserve our 193 million acres of amazing forests and grasslands.”

Land management plans under the final rule will include:

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