And now for the lengthy tutorial. Yes, it is very long and there are lots of pictures... <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/baby.gif" alt="" />


Here's a photo of the Track Finder locker installed in the open carrier. I purchased mine already installed through a middle-man in South Korea. I suspect the locker isn't too hard to install. But all-in-all, I think buying it with the carrier isn't a bad way to go.

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I found the easiest way to install the ring gear and torque it to 56 ft/lbs was to hold it in a vice, using the flat sides of the carrier as the bind-point...

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Before doing anything else, I mounted the diff in the housing without the pinion installed, applying some preload on the carrier bearings to ensure there was no lateral-play. Then I measured the run-out on the backside of the ring gear. It was off by only 0.001-0.002". So I continued with the installation of the pinion...

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Here's a pic of the solid spacer with shims and the crush sleeve I pulled off the old pinion. Yes, the solid spacer is definitely a good way to go. And I'll argue that the setup is easier than a crush sleeve...

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The pinion spacer sits between the two pinion bearings. It establishes AND maintains a set-physical distance between the bearings, allowing them to be compressed a wee-bit by the pinion nut - but only enough to set the proper preload on the bearings. The distance between the bearings will always be correct, no matter how much torque is applied by the pinion nut. That is not the case with a crush sleeve...

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Setting the preload is not as difficult as some people will argue. The first step in the process is to load the pinion with the solid spacer AND all of the shims that are included with it. After torquing down the pinion nut (you can do this with an impact wrench), you need to measure the amount of play between the pinion bearings. This can be done by using a dial indicator on the end of the pinion gear...

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I measured 0.038" of play with all shims installed...

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Once you have that value, remove the pinion and measure the shim stack.

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Then remove a number of shims equal to that value, or as close as you can get. This will set your "zero-load".

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Re-install your pinion with spacer and the zero-load shim stack and torque it all down. You should have zero-lash in the bearings, but the pinion should spin easily (no preload). Per the instructions from Weir Performance, you should then remove about 0.003-0.004" of shim to establish proper preload.

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NOTE: Kia specs the pinion bearing preload at 10 inch-pounds. Weir, per the Miata specs, states 15-20 inch pounds is appropriate for new bearings. After looking at a variety of spec for similar-sized pinion sets, I will say that if you can get anywhere in the 10-20 inch-pound range, go with it. You might not be able to remove the "perfect" amount of shim - and it will be only 1 shim.

I was doing my initial setup using a pair of bearings that had the bores opened up just enough that they would slide on and off the pinion shaft - no press required. After getting the preload set with those bearings, I found the preload was too high for the permament bearing set I was installing. So I had to take out another 0.004" of shim (about) to get an acceptable preload. Fine-tuning the preload was easy. And using the setup-bearings minimized the number of times I had to press the front/outer pinion bearing on and off the shaft. I think the setup-bearings are a good investment. But that's just my opinion...

Once you have the pinon bearing preload set, you should measure the run-out on the pinion flange. Per Kia specs, it should be no more than 0.004" (off the top of my head). But with a new set of bearings, I measured 0.000"...

[img]http://i999.photobucket.com/albums/af117/peabody1986/Sportage/DSC01522.jpg[/img]


So you have your pinion dialed in. What's next? Load your diff carrier into the housing with the pinion installed. Adjust the bearing preload and backlash. If you don't have "pin wrench", you can use two punches or similar tools with a pry bar to adjust the carrier bearing position and preload...

[img]http://i999.photobucket.com/albums/af117/peabody1986/Sportage/DSC01515.jpg[/img]


Then you will begin the lengthy-ballet of adjusting the bearings, measuring the preload and the backlash...

Preload: Kia spec is based on a "Go/No-Go" tool. Miatas and RX7s are spec'd at 7.3004-7.3031" (1.8 diff - same as our Sporty diffs, both front and rear). Measure the preload on the opposing-flats on the bearing caps. Measure both pairs and make sure they are within spec...

[img]http://i999.photobucket.com/albums/af117/peabody1986/Sportage/DSC01517.jpg[/img]


Then measure your backlash using a dial indicator. Measure a minimum of 4 points on the ring gear - every 1/4-turn. I found that the values changed on the same tooth within 3-4 rotations. I suspect this is probably due to the pairing of a specific ring gear tooth with differing positions on the pinion. If a majority of your values are within spec (0.0036-0.0043"), you are good. I found a range of 0.0025-0.005" on my values, with most being within 0.003-0.004". As long as you aren't getting any tight spots (0.000") or excessively-loose, then don't sweat it. If you do, try removing your ring gear, rotating it 90 or 180 degrees, then check it again. That might do the trick...

[img]http://i999.photobucket.com/albums/af117/peabody1986/Sportage/DSC01516.jpg[/img]

Once you have the preload and backlash set, apply some gear marking compound to the ring gear. I applied it to about 4 teeth at each position I measured the backlash. The compound I used doesn't dry like paint. So the excess will carry over to the unmarked teeth on the ring gear. You will be able to see the contact pattern all around the ring gear - no need to mark every tooth. Turn the ring gear around 3 times in both directions. I have read the R&P should be "under load" when checking the contact pattern. But I have also heard from auto-tech instructors that you can't get a realistic amount of preload on a 3rd member-type diff. So testing-on-the-bench is fine.

That noted, the purpose of looking at the contact pattern is to verify that the pinion shim located between the inner/rear pinion bearing (32207) and the pinion head establishes the proper depth between pinion and ring gear. I found that the factory-installed shims with my front and rear 4.77 R&Ps were the perfect match with the new 5.38 R&Ps. So there's a good chance that your old pinion shim is the one you will need. If you need more depth, try getting a shim set for a Dana 30 pinion. The shims are very close in bore-diameter to the Sporty's and should be a good match. Also, Dana 30 pinion shim kits are readily-available (in the U.S., at least). Here's a set of pics showing a good contact pattern... <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

Drive side of gear...

[img]http://i999.photobucket.com/albums/af117/peabody1986/Sportage/DSC01514.jpg[/img]

Coast side of gear...

[img]http://i999.photobucket.com/albums/af117/peabody1986/Sportage/DSC01513.jpg[/img]


Setting the pinion depth will likely be the hardest part of the job if the stock-shim doesn't get it done. Moving the pinion closer to the ring gear is easy - just add some extra shims. But moving the pinion away from the ring gear will require a thinner shim altogether... or a stack of thin, compatible shims. However, I strongly-suspect the factory shim will do the job, and do it well.

Once you have a good contact pattern, torque down your bearing caps and locking tabs, then crack open some brew and celebrate - you're ready to load that 3rd member up and get that pony back on the trail!!! <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/kewl.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/kewl.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/kewl.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/kewl.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/kewl.gif" alt="" />

Two last tips...

- I found it was best to mount the dial indicator to the housing using a 3/8" bolt (long... 7", at least). The magnetic base I was using couldn't get a stable hold on the diff housing. So mounting directly to the housing will give you the most accurate measurements. And when you are dealing with 0.001" values, a stable mount will save you lots of time and frustration...

[img]http://i999.photobucket.com/albums/af117/peabody1986/Sportage/DSC01502.jpg[/img]


- And here's how to secure the pinion while torquing or removing the pinion nut. Don't try to hold the flange with your hand... <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/zombie.gif" alt="" />

[img]http://i999.photobucket.com/albums/af117/peabody1986/Sportage/DSC01508.jpg[/img]



On Everet's cocktail-scale, I'd rate this job a full-kegger!!! <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/zombie.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/zombie.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/zombie.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/zombie.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/zombie.gif" alt="" />

But you CAN do it!!!

<img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cheers.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cheers.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cheers.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cheers.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/cheers.gif" alt="" />

<img src="/forums/images/graemlins/patriot.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/patriot.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/patriot.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/patriot.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/patriot.gif" alt="" />


1997 Sportage 4x4, auto-trans, Warn manual hubs, 4" UPYOURKIA front lift, TJ 106AA rear springs, 2-5/8" body lift, 31x10.50 treads, SmittyBilt SRC front and XRC rear bumper, swing-out tire mount, OBX LSD front diff, Track Finder rear locker, 5.38 R&Ps and... really crappy gas mileage! <img src="/forums/images/graemlins/shiner.gif" alt="" />